Blind Spot Troubles?

Blind Spot Troubles?

I was interested in the Mercedes Benz advertisement we analyzed in class and I did some googling into more Mercedes Benz commercials. This particular advertisement intrigued me because it was an illusion that served their purpose perfectly. It is so ingenious but so simple at the same time. It is saying the driver of a Mercedes Benz with “blind spot assistance” can look to the side without actually looking, like the illusion displays. The target audience for this advertisement would be older adults that have trouble turning their body to look to their blind spot or adults with children and need the extra assistance. The denotative meaning of this advertisement is that Mercedes Benz is now offering blind spot assistance. The connotative meaning of this advertisement is, if you are having trouble turning to your blind spot or have a rowdy family and need that extra help Mercedes Benz can help you.

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4 comments

  1. I agree with you that this ad ingenious yet so simple and I think it does a great job of getting the viewer’s attention. Even as I was scrolling through the blog deciding what image to comment on, this one caught my attention and I had to look twice at it. I also think this ad is for people who may be paranoid or super cautious drivers because we see the person looking in two different directions and if we look at it quick enough we can almost see the man’s face flipping back and forth between looking forward and looking to the side. This ad goes to show how distracting it is to look back and forth because the viewer may be trying to figure out exactly where the man depicted is looking. To me this is showing some kind of fast past, continuously looking this is distracting both to the viewer but also the driver. I think this ad really drives home the message that Mercedes helps out their customers in so many ways from providing them with a nice, luxury car with a comfortable ride, all the way down to having a blind spot assistance.

  2. I do agree that this ad does a great job drawling in the viewer. As soon as I looked at it I wondered what in the world it was and what it had to do with the Benz symbol at the bottom. This advertisement does a great job drawling the viewer in because it makes the person what to know what the strange image is. It is also unique because you thing like this often. It does do a good job getting its point across about the blind spot. I do not agree with Rob on the point he makes about old people, because whether you are 16 or 85, both people have blind spots. I think this ad is directed to everyone.

  3. I agree with Rob, and this advertisement is very creative and effective. The advertisement is very interesting and does its job of catching the viewers attention. I think this audience is mostly for parents. When parents are driving their newborns or children, they want the safest car possible. It could always work for parents who are looking for cars for their teenagers that are new to driving. This advertisement can be considered so effective because it does not even show the car. It makes the viewer want to look up the car to see what it even looks like. Just knowing there is blind spot assistant, the viewer wants to look up what other technological advancements this car has because Mercedes Benz is already considered a luxury car. This advertisement is taking abstract art and creating a very effective advertisement.

  4. You all make some great points about why this is an effective advertisement. It shows the positive aspects of technology working with humans. The car (represented, as you point out Steve, just by its logo) enables the driver to become superhuman — to have an enhanced sense of vision — by looking sideways and forward at the same time. The fact that the man pictured is relatively young speaks to Steve’s point about everyone having problems with blind spots. So here, the advertisement isn’t selling beauty and luxury (as the ad we talked about in class did) but safety, sensibility, and advanced technology.

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